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Your Questions About How To Discover New Species

James asks…

What are some extinct animals that can be found in the arctic ice caps?

I have to write an essay tomorrow morning for a competition on me discovering and ancient extinct animal. Any help. I don’t want one that is endangered i need one that is extinct and really old. Like i said ancient.
It should be real. But if i can’t come up with anything i could just BS my essay and write on any animal that lived on ice.

New Niche Finder answers:

I agree that wooly mammoth is an obvious candidate. It lived until about 10 thousand years ago.
A giant camel went extinct about the same time:
http://planetsave.com/2013/03/07/extinct-giant-camel-species-discovered-in-the-high-arctic/

Another animal who lived on Arctic land was a hippo-like creature. This was long before Neogene glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere, however, so its remainswon’t be found in ice, only in rock:
http://english.cri.cn/2906/2007/04/25/1261@220132.htm

Helen asks…

What are the effects of Turritopsis Nutricula being an immortal creature?

Although the creature has been around long before we discovered it, what effects, now that we know it is biologically immortal, would it have on our world? (humans, marine life, population, food chain…..)
Or would it not?

Thanks.

New Niche Finder answers:

No idea, but the species name always takes a lower case first letter . . .

David asks…

What are some ways to measure plant density?

I’m wondering how to measure plant density for a science project. So far, I’ve discovered counting/measuring plants in one area is one way. Another way is to use the same square and estimate in percentages how much of it is covered in plants. Thanks!

New Niche Finder answers:

One way to quantify plant cover is to use the point-intercept method. This will give you a percent cover for total vegetation or for each species This will give you data similar to estimating percent. However, the advantage of this is that you don’t have to estimate — you make an actual measurement.

Here’s the general method. Lay out a transect or grid in your plots. Drop a pin at random points (maybe every 10cm along a transect or at the intersections on you grid pattern). Record each plant that the pin touches. If you make a total of 100 drops and 50 drops hit plants, you would have a total vegetation cover of 50%.

Thomas asks…

Are plants wholly and completely determined by physics, biological and chemistry laws?

Laws that are observable and discovered? If so, what are those laws?

New Niche Finder answers:

All life is determined by physics, without getting too deep, for example a tree can only grow so tall, because of the forces of gravity (getting nutrients to the leaves at the top, from the roots and energy from photosynthesis at the top to the rest of the tree, this is similar to animals such as the giraffe, typically the bigger you are (sheer size) relative to the rest of a species the lower the metabolism, hence traditionally a longer life. Physics it what limits evolution by natural selection, refining the mutations so unuseful ones do not prevail, chemical laws work in countless ways but most of the time it is refined according to species, plants, animals and so on… I’m no expert but I hope helps a bit.

Mark asks…

What are Moutian Lions Environment, scientific name, family, and species?

Also, please if you know what Lewis and Clark said specifically about it and what their thoughts were on it, where they first discovered it, and anything else useful!!

New Niche Finder answers:

Mountain lions roam the Americas, where it is also known as a puma, cougar, and catamount. This big cat of many names is also found in many habitats, from Florida swamps to Canadian forests. The scientific name for a mountain lion is Felis concolor. It’s a mammal and of the cat family. You can find out more about the mountain lion on this website

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/mountain-lion/ and What Lewis and clark

specifically found out on their expedition here

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/lewisandclark/record_species_169_10_1.html

Hope i was of any help.

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